Tuesday, August 4, 2015

POWER STEERING FAILURE

ELECTRO-MECHANICAL POWER STEERING FAIURE 


It was a perfect sunny day  with hardly any breeze when my wife and I decided to go for a Sunday outing. So we loaded the  VW Polo 2.0L Highline. With picnic umbrella packed and picnic basket filled with food and refreshments in the boot, I mounted the bicycle holder on the tow-bar ball and attached our 2 bicycles, and off we went. But our joy and contentment was very abruptly interrupted approximately halfway to our destination. This is probably the worst thing that can happen to any unsuspecting driver whilst driving in a very relaxed state. As I was going around a long but sharp curve my power steering kinda "froze for a second" and since I was steering with one hand, which is all it normally takes because the steering is so light. But before I could respond with two hands, I instinctively braked and with screeching tyres, I hit the pavement so hard that both front airbags popped. The steering had suddenly gone hard/stiff/difficult to turn. Fortunately there wasn't a another car involved and even more fortunate nobody got injured except my pride. I first thing that went through my mind after calming the wife down and confirming that she was ok, was the extent of the damage. 

As the airbags deflated I looking at the dashboard and saw all the light on the dashboard glowing. The yellow EPC light was on, the yellow steering wheel light (K161) was on, the ABS light was on, the red battery light was on, and the yellow brake pad light was on and I realized the ignition was still on.  So I tried started the engine and it wouldn't take, switch the ignition off and tried again, all the light went out and the car idled. On further inspection, I saw the rim that hit the curb was deformed and the tyre was flat. I figured I could just fit the spare and we would be on our way. As I reversed away from the pavement, and very peculiarly the steering was back to normal. After fitting the spare wheel, I could once again turn the steering two full turns in either direction with one hand. This was very odd, yet funny enough, the Polo just came back from its  100k service / cam belt replacement a short while ago. I'm certain if there was any problem with my steering my machy would have told me but he said absolutely nothing. Anyway, so we eventually get home and as I turn into the driveway the steering goes hard/stiff/difficult to turn once again. As I drove forward the steering returned to normal. So I popped the bonnet, checking for anything out of the ordinary. I rolled under the Polo, checked the steering control module, looked at the steering pump (V187), yet it all checked out fine. Out came VCDS and I scanned the Polo and found the battery connection to be intermittent. Look at the 18010/P1602 error below.

Chassis Type: 9N - VW Polo
Scan: 01,02,03,08,09,15,17,19,25,37,44,45,46,56,76
---------------------------------------------------
Address 01: Engine       Labels: None
Controller: 06A 906 032 PB
Component: 2.0l ME7.5.10       0305
Coding: 00071
Shop #: WSC 01120
AAVZZZ9NZ7UXXXXX     VWZ7Z0G52XXXXX
1 Faults Found:
18010 -  Power Supply Terminal 30: Voltage too Low
P1602 - 35-10 -   - - Intermittent
Readiness: 0000 0000
---------------------------------------------------
Address 15: Airbags
Control Module Part Number: 6Q0 909 601 F
Component and/or Version: 05 AIRBAG VW5  0010
Software Coding: 12341
Work Shop Code: WSC 31414
6 Faults Found:
00595 -  Crash Data Stored
35-00 -   -
01214 - Crash Data for Belt Tensioner Stored
35-00 - -
00588 - Airbag Igniter; Driver Side (N95)
32-00 - Resistance too High
00589 - Airbag Igniter 1; Passenger Side (N131)
29-10 - Short to Ground - Intermittent
00589 - Airbag Igniter 1; Passenger Side (N131)
32-10 - Resistance too High - Intermittent
01280 -  Airbag; Passenger Side; Disabled
35-00 -   -
---------------------------------------------------

Thereafter I decided I was going to take the Polo back on the road. So I reversed out of the driveway then suddenly the problem was back. The only thing I did was climb the 30 mm coping at the edge of the driveway so I drove back into the driveway and as I back wheels hit the driveway copping with steering was fine once more. Since the steering pump (V187) actually stops working for the second or so, it had to be something to do with the power. So i pulled on every visible cable that goes into the wiring harness to the steering pump (V187). I even checked the enclosed fuses on top of the battery when I noticed that the negative battery terminal wasn't properly tightened.  As I tightened the nut I discovered the nut was stripped and wouldn't tighten then realized this had to be the problem. I scratched around in the garage, found a screw that would work, tightened the battery terminal and revered out of the driveway and back in and out and in and out and in and it didn't happen again. So I called my wife and asked her move the steering to and fro with her hand while standing outside the Polo with her hand  through the open window. I loosened the terminal and disconnected the battery while the polo was idling. when it was disconnected my wife could move the steering and when I replace the terminal she couldn't. So I was totally convinced that the intermittent battery contact caused intermittent power to he pump which is exactly what happened a second before I fit the pavement.  

So now I have to track down the cowboy who stripped by battery terminal nut because the  last time I took the battery out to replace my headlight bulbs I personally tightened it an am darn sure it wasn't stripped which was roughly a week before it went for that major service. It just had to be one of the workshop guys that was responsible so like three days later I went to my VW /Audi machy's workshop to complain and demand compensation for the damage to my car but got the saddest news. The same Sunday that my wife and I want for our picnic my VW/Audi machy was out biking and got killed in a head-on collision and died on the spot. Here are some power steering problems listed below, all of which seem to have a (G85) sensor issue.

Address 03: ABS Brakes
Controller: 7L0 907 379 G
Component: ESP ALLRAD MK25 0203
Coding: 0006402
Shop #: WSC 3141
00778 - Steering Angle Sensor (G85)
000 - -

Address 34: Level Control
Controller: 7L0 907 553 F
Component: LUFTFDR.-CDC- 3C3P1 3081
Coding: 0015521
Shop #: WSC 02631
00778 - Steering Angle Sensor (G85)
004 - No Signal/Communication

Address 03: ABS Brakes
Part No: 6Q0 907 379 M
Component: front H02 0001 ESP 5.7
Coding: 0000000
Shop #: WSC 00000 000 00000
00778 - Steering Angle Sensor (G85) 
005 - No or Incorrect Basic Setting / Adaptation

Address 44: Steering Assist
Part No: 1K1 909 144 J
Component: EPS_ZFLS Kl.5   D04 1606
Shop #: WSC 00000 000 00000
00778 - Steering Angle Sensor (G85)
000 - -

Address 03: ABS Brakes    
Part No: 1K0 907 379 K
Component: ESP FRONT MK60      0104
Coding: 0021121
00778 - Steering Angle Sensor (G85) 
005 - No or Incorrect Basic Setting / Adaptation

Address 44: Steering Assist Labels: 6Q0-423-156.lbl
Part No: 6R0 423 156 B
Component: LenkhilfeTRW V277
Coding: 11221
Shop #: WSC 06402
00778 - Steering Angle Sensor (G85) 
49-00 - No Communications

When I surfed the net, I discovered that several other VW owners experience similar problems. Here a dude who says:- "The dealership keeps giving my car back to me unfixed yet still replacing parts! The dangerous part of this is the steering locks up when the car dies and I'ts still moving. I am fearful of driving it and I haven't gotten anywhere with VW.  I am not alone and that it seems to be the same particular year and engine as mine in most owners replies.  I would like to help find a solution before any serious accidents happen or anyone is hurt. Thanks".

The Steering Angle Sensor (G85) is an opto coupler fitted in a collar under the steering wheel airbag  which sends a steering wheel position to the Power Steering Control Module (J500) at the base of the steering column interfacing with the Electro-mechanical Power Steering Motor V187 all of which need power to operate properly. 

Monday, August 3, 2015

VAG FUEL TRIM PROBLEMS

SHORT TERM FUEL TRIM ISSUES

Modern day OBD-II systems can be described as high-end electronic systems that "sort of" took the automotive industry by surprise. As such , there are so many motor mechanics that have not made the transition from technologies prevalent in older model cars to the technologies pervasive in newer model cars yet, and understandably some never will.  Several of these motor mechanics don't even own a scan tool and even fewer of them are able to interpret the DTCs and the results of a diagnostic scan. With the  result, that many VW owners took it upon themselves to become ODB-II savvy and even do their own automobile repairs. Many of whom have invested in low end scan tools like VAG COM, Actron, Nextech Carmen,  Foxwell, OBD Scan, Altar, etc, and others invested in high end scan tools like G-Scan, VCDS, Xtool, Launch, AutoHex, Autel and Auto Boss etc. Even though the VW service departments are equipt with the best diagnostic scan tools they tend to lack the technical personnel with the requisite expertise to understand them and effectively repair clients VW, Audi, SEAT and SKODA cars. Electronics has taken over the modern day car and being knowledgeable about electronics is key however not every car owner  is therefore not equipt to to analyse the diagnostic printout. As an example, lets take a look at the infamous VAG fuel trim problems list below. All of them very loudly shouts that the stoichiometric  ratio is off. Generic Short Term Fuel Trim (STFT) DTCs range from P0170- P0175 which are generic government required codes and Long Term Fuel Trim (LTFT) range from P1123-P1130, P1139-P1139,  P1151-P1152, P0166-P1167 and all are manufacturer specific.

SHORT TERM FUEL TRIM (STFT)


16554 - P0170 - Fuel Trim, Bank1 Malfunction
16555 - P0171 - Fuel Trim, Bank1 System too Lean
16556 - P0172 - Fuel Trim, Bank1 System too Rich
16557 - P0173 - Fuel Trim, Bank2 Malfunction
16558 - P0174 - Fuel Trim, Bank2 System too Lean
16559 - P0175 - Fuel Trim, Bank2 System too Rich

LONG TERM FUEL TRIM (LTFT)

17531 - P1123 - Long Term Fuel Trim Add.Air, Bank1 System too Rich
17532 - P1124 - Long Term Fuel Trim Add.Air, Bank1 System too Lean
17533 - P1125 - Long Term Fuel Trim Add.Air, Bank2 System too Rich
17534 - P1126 - Long Term Fuel Trim Add.Air, Bank2 System too Lean

17535 - P1127 - Long Term Fuel Trim mult, Bank1 System too Rich
17536 - P1128 - Long Term Fuel Trim mult, Bank1 System too Lean
17537 - P1129 - Long Term Fuel Trim mult, Bank2 System too Rich
17538 - P1130 - Long Term Fuel Trim mult, Bank2 System too Lean

17544 - P1136 - Long Term Fuel Trim Add.Fuel, Bank1 System too Lean
17545 - P1137 - Long Term Fuel Trim Add.Fuel, Bank2 System too Lean
17547 - P1139 - Long Term Fuel Trim Add.Fuel, Bank2 System too Rich

17559 - P1151 - Bank1, Long Term Fuel Trim, Range 1 Leanness Lower Limit Exceeded
17560 - P1152 - Bank1, Long Term Fuel Trim, Range 2 Leanness Lower Limit Exceeded

17573 - P1165 - Bank1, Long Term Fuel Trim, Range 1 Rich Limit Exceeded
17574 - P1166 - Bank1, Long Term Fuel Trim, Range 2 Rich Limit Exceeded

17582 - P1174 - Fuel Trim, Bank 1 Different injection times

THE DEFINITION OF A BANK

Before we continue, it is important to get certain definitions right. In 8 cylinder (W8) engines and 12 cylinder (W12) engines, 4 or 6 cylinders are staggered  aligned at a V-angle,  72 degrees in relation each other, thereby making the engine more compact.  Each staggered row of either 4 or 6 cylider has its own head,  which is called a "Bank",  hence Bank 1 and Bank 2. On the other hand VR6 engines cylinders are also staggered but has a single cylinder head, however the three left most side cylinders (odd numbers) are called "Bank 1" (passenger side left-hand drive) and the right most cylinders (even numbers) are called Bank 2. Four cylinder engines normally have 4 in-line cylinders but here as well, the odd cylinders are called Bank 1 and the even cylinders Bank 2 as can be seen in the "Chassic type: Skoda Fabia  1,2l/4V" below. But this configuration does apply to all 4 and 5 cylinders engines because in some engines all cylinders are referred to as bank 1. Looking at  the above P-Codes  P0170-P0175 it can clearly be seen that  P0107 refers to Bank 1 and is common to both  P0171 and P0172. And likewise P01703 refers to Bank 2 and is common to both  P01704 and P0175. This information allows us to determine which cylinder is bank is running rich or lean. Intermittent signals may be due to continuous STFT occurrences or the bad electrical connections at the o2 sensors. However, every time the engine is started the OBD-II system  does a self test on the O2 sensors,  and should the Check engine light not remain on, then the O2 sensor is probably not the culprit.
______________________________________________________________________

Chassis Type: 6N - VW Polo
16554 - Fuel Trim: Malfunction: Bank 1
P0170 - 35-10 - - - Intermittent

Chassis Type: 6N - VW Polo
16555 - Fuel Trim; Bank 1: System Too Lean
P0171 - 35-10 - - - Intermittent

Chassis Type: 6Y - Skoda Fabia
16555 - Fuel Trim: System Too Lean: Bank 1
P0171 - 35-10 - - - Intermittent

Chassis Type: 3B - VW Passat B5
16555 - Fuel Trim: System Too Lean: Bank 1
P0171 - 35-10 - - - Intermittent

Chassis Type: 9N - VW Polo
16555 - Fuel Trim; Bank 1
P0171 - 35-10 - System Too Lean - Intermittent

Chassis Type: Audi 3.2
16556 - Fuel Trim; Bank 1
P0172 - 35-10 - System Too Rich - Intermittent

Chassic type: Skoda Fabia  1,2l/4V 
16557 - Fuel Trim: Malfunction: Bank 2
P0173 - 35-10 - - - Intermittent

Chassis Type: 6N - VW Polo
16556 - Fuel Trim; Bank 1
P0172 - 35-10 - System Too Rich - Intermittent

Chassis Type: 3B - VW Passat B5
16556 - Fuel Trim; Bank 1
P0172 - 35-10 - System Too Rich - Intermittent

Chassis Type: 1J - VW G/J/B Mk4
16556 - Fuel Trim: System Too Rich: Bank 1
P0172 - 35-10 - - - Intermittent

Chassis Type: 9N - VW Polo
16556 - Fuel Trim: System Too Rich: Bank 1
P0172 - 35-10 - - - Intermittent

Chassis Type: 6N - VW Polo 
16556 - Fuel Trim; Bank 1
 P0172 - 35-10 - System Too Rich - Intermittent

Chassis Type: 8D - Audi A4 B5
16557 - Fuel Trim; Bank 2: system too lean
P0174 - System too Lean

Chassis Type: 4F0 - Audi A6 3.2L
16559 - Fuel Trim; Bank 2
P0175 - 007 - System Too Rich

Chassis Type: 4A - Audi 100/A6 C4
16559 - Fuel Trim: System Too Rich: Bank 2
P0175 - 35-00 - -
16556 - Fuel Trim: System Too Rich: Bank 1
P0172 - 35-10 - - - Intermittent
16557 - Fuel Trim: Malfunction: Bank 2
P0173 - 35-00 - -
16554 - Fuel Trim: Malfunction: Bank 1
P0170 - 35-10 - - - Intermittent

Chassis Type: 8D - Audi A4 B5
16554 - Fuel Trim; Bank 1: Malfunction
P0170 - 92-00 - Unknown Error Elaboration
16554 - Fuel Trim, Bank 1
P0173 - 92-00 - Unknown Error Elaboration
17658 - Fuel Level too Low

Audi A4 B5 96 a4 2.8l
16558 - P0174 - Fuel Trim, Bank 2
P0174  - System too Lean  -detecting lean fuel in exhaust
16555 -  Fuel Trim, Bank 1
P0171  - System too Lean -- detecting lean fuel in exhaust
16554   Malfunction
P0170 - 35-10 - - - reached maximum amount of fuel adjustment
16557 - Fuel Trim; Bank 2
P0173 - Malfunction

Fuel Trim: System Too Rich means / Rich Mixture implying too much fuel, not sufficient air
Fuel Trim: System Too Lean means / Lean Mixture, implying too much air, not sufficient fuel

Correct combustion relies on an air/fuel mixture of 14.7 to 1 ratio. Meaning 14.7 parts air to every 1 part of fuel, but if  the air ratio dips below 14.7 parts, then the mixture is called  "rich", whereas when the air exceeds 14.7 parts, then the mixture it is called  "lean".  To keep the engine running properly, the Engine Control Module measures the oxygen content in the exhaust emissions with the oxygen (O2) sensors in the exhaust system and makes adjustments to the mixture by injecting more or less fuel. The ECU is capable of keeping the STFT air/fuel mix within  specific parameters under normal conditions, and is based on input signals  from the Barometric Pressure Sensor and the Oxygen Sensor and will make minor adjustments to the air/fuel mixture. However when these adjustments it makes exceed a internally stored predetermined level, it sets  a fault code. When DTC P0171 and P0174 are triggered, the oxygen sensors are detecting too much oxygen in the exhaust fumes instructing the ECU to add more fuel in order to maintain a correct  air/fuel mixture.  But when DTC P0172 and P0173 are triggered the reverse is implemented. When DTC P0170 and P0173 are triggered the ECU is unable to compensate for the errors and uses an internally generate signal as compensation.  The main causes of STFT DTCs are due to leaking vacuum  hoses or a poorly functioning  Mass Air Flow Sensor sensing too little air or a faulty Barometric Pressure sensor or insufficient Fuel Pump pressure. Functionality of all these sensors can be checked by verifying there scan data before attempting to replace them. Cleaning the MAF wire with electro cleaner may help but take care not to damage it. Symptoms of STFT DTC may cause the EPC light to come on, make the car go into limp mode, stall, hesitate before acceleration, idle unevenly, backfire and refuse to idle. LTFT will be dealt with in future blog.


Friday, July 31, 2015

CHECK ENGINE LIGHT

VW BASHING

In my humble opinion I think VW manufactures pretty decent cars especially since  several of their models  won car of the year, a few years in a row. In fact VW Polo is probably the least troublesome VAG car and unfortunately the VW Jetta is the most troublesome. However not everyone is impressed with VW and from what goes around  at VW service departments and especially coming from the mouths of VW owners,  borders on disgust and disappointment. Some of the things I've heard them say are:- Volkswagens Suck- and their service departments suck even more. They are an unorganized bunch of monkeys ... VW as a company - customer service is definitely not their priority. The Worst customer service I have EVER received.  VW cars need no introduction but they do need constant attention. I will never buy Volkswagen again. As soon as my VW Golf gets out of the shop I'm trading it in for a Hyundai! Volkswagon cars are shit. I'm seriously interested in a "don't buy VW campaign". Never, ever buy a Volkswagen because VW service departments give Toyota cars as loaners. I really loved Jettas before, but now they SUCK. 


Volkswagen do not have an engine number, it an expire date. When I said I drive a VW, the mechanic said "what a shitty vehicle". I don't know how I will sell this disaster of a car! So don't sell it - just trade it in and get a non-VW. The time and effort to fight with corporate Volkswagen will get you no where. Their monkeys do what they are trained to do. Most VWs are lemons and the service people know it. VW quality and service is terrible - I will never buy another VW product.  VW service people are complete fools. Mostly my problems have been with idiot VW repair people, piss poor VW customer service, yep I agree a lot of service departments do suck. VW "wear and tear" - what a load of crap - more like cheaply made, more plastic than metal. The service people at VW are awful to deal with because they know VW sucks. My recent problems with bad service turned to NO service after calling VWoA. Customer service at VW sucks...they are programmed to say: "I'm sorry you are having issues with you vehicle" over and over. 

So, where does this leave avid VW fans like you and me? Do we jump on the VW bashing band wagon or do we take a stand? What I'd like to say in defence of VW, is that since the SAE mandated ODB-II for all makes of vehicles built after 1996  and even supplied a list of generic diagnostic Trouble Codes (DTCs), meaning codes relevant to all cars. Its only a matter of time before all modern day cars start misbehaving and frustrate their owners like some VWs frustrate some of their owners. Little do we know what is happening in the diagnostic and repair, misbehaving and frustration ranks of Honda, Mercedes Benz, Kia, Hyundai,  Opel, Ford, GWM, Renault, Mazda, Alfa Romeo, Bentley, Chrysler, Fiat, Nissan, Jaguar, Lexus, Jeep, Chery, Daewoo, Toyota, Mitsubishi, Peugot, Volvo, Tata, Citroen, Dodge, Proton, Suzuki, Geely, BMW, Isuzu, Porche, etc. Considering most mechanical service departments may not have the necessary electronic savvy diagnostic skilled technical personal, automotive problems are going to be on the rise and more expensive to repair than ever before because unskilled and untrained mechanics are bound to take "like forever" to find the faults by guessing and by trial and error. I personally know of a case where a car  was in for service and repair for 52 days in a single year because the "automotive technicians" could not locate the source of the trouble.

COMMON VW CHECK ENGINE LIGHT PROBLEMS

A typical problem with Jetta / Jetta GLI / Jetta GLI 2.0L T / Jetta LX 5 cyl (2010-2011) / VW  Passat, Beetle, Golf, Tiguan, Routan, Eos, GTI and the VW  Taureg is the Check Engine Light (CEL) aka (MIL-Malfunction Indicator Lamp) that flashes continually or stays on especially in cold weather which is normally caused by a faulty Check Engine Light sensor. But when the Check Engine Light  (CEL) aka (MIL- Malfunction Indicator Lamp) comes on and the whole car shudders and shakes in an almost uncontrollable manner, not only does it sound expensive but also feels expensive. Check Engine Light  (CEL) aka (MIL-Malfunction Indicator Lamp) is also associated with failure to start, noisy  cranking, backfires, stalling and shaking, rev hesitation, visible black emissions and even engine fires. These issues often flags a P300 (random misfire) which motor mechanics, sorry "automotive technicians" readily pass over as a random glitch, returning the car to the owner saying "no problem found". A glitch that is bound to reoccur whist driving on the inside lane during peak hour traffic, which could consequently leave  the driver stranded on the express way.  This supposedly random error is actually a tell tail sign uttered by one of the ignition coils ( N70, N127, N291, N292) or injectors (N30-N34). A failing Ignition Coil  or a failing Injector gives exactly the same symptoms, upto and including turning on the EPC light (Electronic Power Control), the Check Engine Light (CEL) aka (MIL-Malfunction Indicator Lamp), limits the power and sends the car into limp mode and flags the relevant Diagnostic Trouble Codes (DTCs). Injector DTCs are from P0200 to P0212 and P0261 to P0296. Whereas Ingiton coils DTCs are normally from P02300 to P02335. Unlike older cars that have one coil that could go faulty, which would stop the car in its tracks. Modern day Volkswagen cars, have one ignition coil for each spark plug, implying 4 times the possibility of failure on a 4 cylinder and 6 times  the possibility of failure on a 6 cylinder engine and more ignition coils for the spark plugs per cylinder engines.  If 1 ignition coil or 1 injector fails, the other coils continue to keeps on firing their individual spark plugs. Along with the functioning injectors  keep the engine running but unbalanced due to one cylinder not lagging behind-- because of a dead coil or injector. This shake is so bad that it makes driving the car virtually impossible.  Since, it is very unlikely that 2 coils or 2 injectors would fail at exactly the very same instant, a quick and easy repair method is to keep a new spare coil and injector in the tools box which could be replaced by the process of elimination until the problem is solved.
The other common Check Engine Light  (CEL) aka ( (MIL-Malfunction Indicator Lamp) culprit is the mass air flow (MAF) sensor (G70) which works in conjunction with the Oxygen (O2) sensor to provide the correct volume of air for  stoichiometric calculations.  The MAF is situated between the throttle body and the air filter pan and sends direct predicted air flow data to the ECU, while the oxygen sensor sends feedback data to the ECU so that it can  make the minor corrections to the predicted air mass. Mass Air Flow Sensors (G70) are mechanical devices and therefore prone to failure since their measuring elements tend to get worn overtime, flagging  P1144, P1145 or P1146 DTCs. Mass Air Flow Sensors can possibly cause a wide range of engine problems much like those caused by the ignition coils and injectors. It is therefore essential to download the Diagnostic Trouble code (DTC) memory to determine whether the ignition coils, the injectors or the Mass Air Flow Sensors is causing the problem.

Thursday, July 30, 2015

EPC Q & A

EPC Q & A

So many Audi, VW, SKODA and SEAT owner are having EPC light nightmares. Sending their vehicles for EPC repair which are often misdiagnosed, costly, ineffective and futile because most mechanical repair personal are not electronically trained hence have no idea of  digital logic and isolation procedures.  Modern cars are strewn with sensors and actuators, network buses, electronic control modules driven by software. To quote a line in Turks and Caicos which goes something like this "... everything changes. I used to be able to take a wrench and get under my car's bonnet and fix my car. Now you need a degree in electronics. Even easy things are difficult now." Replacing automotive components does not have to turn into a 'wild goose chase' where guess work is based on trial and error which now has become the order of the day.  That approach just scares everyone. Upload the diagnostic scan of your car now, so that I can analyse for you before you go ahead and buy expensive parts only to find out that the DTC was incorrectly interpreted.




Question?

I'm Lorraine from long beach. I don't know who you are but you are a God to me. I've been searching the web for months for specific and in-depth information on the "death light" (EPC) appearing on my '99 Volkswagen  Beetle. I have studied your entire blog and will now have a very interesting conversation with my German Car mechanic on how he can detect once and for all the problem. Already $1,000 in with no results. Thank you. I hope I don't have to sell the car just yet (to whom, I have no idea) throttle body replaced-twice so far-but hmm that Cam Bus section is interesting. My radio went into Safe Mode months ago and then spontaneously came back on (we do not have the code) so maybe we should check that path out as well. Again thank you.

Answer!

Hi Lorraine, since you don't say much about the specific problem that you are having other than the "death light" (EPC) appearing on my '99 Beetle, I really can't comment on it. However since it is EPC related, your problem has something to do with fuel delivery and engine torque electronics. Bear in mind that your fuel is under pressure from the tank to the injectors and that the ECU receives inputs from the various pressure sensors. If any of these pressures are below spec, it can trigger an EPC problem. For example, if your fuel cap does not seal properly the low fuel pressure sensor G410 will send a error signal to the ECU which can trigger an EPC fault. Likewise if the fuel regulator sensor cannot equilize the fuel pressure from the high-pressure fuel system it will trigger an EPC fault. Suppose If you were driving on an incline like an on-ramp to a bridge and didn't gear down sufficiently for you Beetle to swiftly climb with ease, the likely hood is that detonation would occur. If this happens, the knock sensors would inform the ECU which translate detonation as insufficient torque and trigger the EPC circuit - limp mode and EPC light. There are several other EPC possibilities but without a diagnostic scan it is difficult to pin point the problem.


Question?

Anonymous. I have a '07 Polo 1.4 16v BUD. I don't have any lights on the dash, but the engine seems really weak through mid revs and is using a bit too much fuel. When I hook up my OBDII there are no faults recorded but when i view the throttle position in real time it doesn't seem to open in a linear manner. As I press the pedal on the road, the throttle valve seems to open slower than the position of the pedal. eg; 50% pedal = 30% throttle position, 80% pedal = 35% throttle, 95% pedal = 40% throttle, 100% Pedal = 100% throttle. As you can see WOT does give WOT at the throttle body, but I don't generally drive with my foot planted on the floor. I am confused why it does this as you would expect the throttle body to open the same amount as the pedal, could it need alignment? I am loathed to take it to the VW dealer for fault diagno$i$ so if anyone has any ideas???? Thanks

Answer!

Hi there. Since you don't have  diagnostic scan its difficult to help you however, the mere fact that you don't have dash light makes it very obviously that you have electrical problems or wiring harness problems. And since your scan tool didn't find any DTCs, further proves that this is the case. The dashboard is normally directly connected to the OBD port in the driver's cockpit and since you have no dash lights you most likely have missing voltages on the OBD port which is most likely needed to perform a proper and correct diagnostic scan. Check your fuses on the terminal 30 line and the relay that supplies the terminal 15  supply line. Once you've exhausted everything else, as a last resort your dash control module could be faulty. Anyway, the acceleration peculiarity that you are describing probably has nothing to do with the dash electronics. Since you car has drive by wire, which is totally electronic (not throttle cable), torque is determined by the ECU which will open the throttle valve logarithmically based on its load and terrain, thus there is no physical correlation between the accelerator pedal and the throttle valve. So, no I don't think it needs alignment but seeing you have an OBD-II scanner, its quite simple for you to just redo the adaptation (described in a previous blog) and take consolation in the fact that you have eliminated it as a problem.

Question?

Hi I have a problem with EPC it came on since yesterday, am worried please help.

Answer!

My friend, you really not giving me much to work with here. But I suggest that read through my blogs pages related to EPC, torque, drive by wire, accelerator pedal sensors, knock sensors,  throttle adaptation, engine RPM sensor, etc. Perhaps if would shed some light on your EPC problem. Remember that EPC problems are related to what the car was doing at the time the light came on. for example, spirited driving / towing / start stop peak hour traffic, etc, Anyway the best way to find blog pages relating to your EPC problem , is to type your search word (EPC / drive by wire, etc) in the search box I provided in the top left hand corner on the first page of my site and click on the miniature magnifying glass to run the search. Happy searching.

Question?

Hi everyone, I would really appreciate some advice from you all. I have a 2002 (52) Ibiza 1.4 Sport (100bph), and have some issues with it. Background: Since day 1 it has occasionally thrown up an EPC warning light, followed by an engine electrics light. They would go away after a day and not return for several months. I had the logs read by a Seat dealer during a service and they said it had shown an intermittent Lambda filter error, and that it would cost £240+ to fit a new one. I passed. Over the last month, this has become an every day occurrence. The EPC light will come on seemingly as I just try to pull away from stationary. The car sometimes (half the time) notably stutters when this happens, then pulls away normally. If I restart the engine, most times the EPC light will go off, but the engine light will stay on. Then, more weirdly, the car has started occasionally stalling at random. No judder, no rough idling, I'll be slowing down towards a roundabout or into traffic, and whilst idling (coasting on the clutch) as I slow down, I'll notice the battery light come on, and the power drop out. Once, the battery light came on, but I was able to rev the engine up and it recovered - the battery light then went out. Mostly, I need to restart the engine though. I took it to a garage called Vee Ws for its annual service yesterday and asked them to look into it as well. They went with a cautious (on my finances) approach, and said they'd do the full service and that hopefully that on its own might rectify some of the issues. After the service, they said the logs showed some intermittent issues but nothing serious. They reset the onboard computer to its basic/default settings and said they hoped that would sort it. They also said they noticed the throttle body was pretty dirty (done 71,000 miles), and that if the service doesn't sort it, that they would try to clean that up and see if it did the job. Anyway, 10 minutes after I pulled away from the garage, the lights came back on and today the stalling re-occurred. I feel like this could turn into one of those 'wild goose chases' where its a case of trial and error, replacing different parts to see if it works. This scares me greatly! Has anyone experienced any similar symptoms, or would anyone recommend going to a proper Seat Dealership/Services team to take a look? I wonder if maybe they may be more likely to find the underlying fault? Having said that, I've always found Vee Ws in Bristolonia competent and most importantly, cost-effective. It may be possible to ask them to try and source used-parts while they try different 'fixes'.. Thanks for any advice, Jamie

Answer!

Hi Jamie,  the fact that your SEAT occasionally throws up an EPC warning light, as well as  the engine electrics light, says that your problem is more likely emission related, hence your intermittent Lambda error. Normally only torque and fuel related problems triggers the EPC light, meaning the engine light doesn't come on. Engine light only comes on with emission related issues.  Considering the age of your car it is possible that the Oxygen censor could be glazed over (end of life) or its wiring connector could be intermittent. The oxygen sensor is a feedback mechanism that instructs the ECU to increase or decrease the fuel supply hence shuddering. But this may not be definite. Without a diagnostic scan, I  am more inclined to say it could be your throttle body sensors not only because your service agent said it was dirty but because of the stalling and stutters on pull away. This seems like the throttle valve isn't providing an adequate air supply when its needed. However if they serviced your SEAT and did the adaptation as they said they did, then its unlikely the throttle body else adaptation would have failed, even though they said its dirty. So its more likely to be your accelerator pedal sensors. I mention this because  the car switches off when you decelerate, implying while your foot was on the accelerator it was OK but by taking your foot off the accelerator the condition changed and the ECU picked of this which could be due to 1 or both intermittent potentiometers. When you initially start the car  the ECU does a self-test by switching on all dashboard lights and if no problems are detected turns them all off. So when you start and the EPC light turns off, at that specific point in time there is no problem, but half way through acceleration while driving the problem is detected and the ECU switches he car off. Intermittent DTCs that do not reoccur during four driving cycles, are automatically deleted from the system which explains why the EPC light goes out after a day or so and doesn't show up months later. Lets have a diagnostic scan and I will have another crack at analyzing your problem.


Wednesday, July 29, 2015

DIAGNOSING EPC LIGHT PROBLEMS

DIAGNOSING EPC LIGHT PROBLEMS

VW Polo EPC light goes on and the car won't rev. Audi MIL and EPC light turn on and car goes into lip mode. SEAT suddenly has no acceleration yet has maximum of 1200 RPM. SKODA accelerator problem, won't rev. Audi EPC light on and transmission is locked in park.
Audi and VW crankshaft position sensors.

Question?

Hello mate...
My car was running really sweet when suddenly I'm having throttle issues! I was going to my girls house when all of a sudden, smack bang in the middle of the road, I have no acceleration. The car just cut the revs into idle and causing the EPC light on the dashboard to light up. I managed to get it off the road out of the traffic. Several attempts later to get her to rev up but  nope, absolutely nothing. So I phoned the towing service and the dude  checked under the bonnet to make sure everything was in place so he disconnected the battery for a while so it would reset the computer. It still wouldn't rev, so he hauled it onto the truck and brought it to my house. My neighbour Freddy has a VCDS which he plugged in and these fault codes showed up. I'm desperately in need of help because I have no idea how  to  solve this problem?

Chassis Type: 6K - Seat Ibiza/Cordoba
Scan: 01 02 03 08 15 17 25 45 56
Mileage: 97850km/60801miles
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Address 01: Engine

Part No: 6K0 906 032
Component: 1.8L R4/20VT SEA 0002
Coding: 11500
Shop #: WSC 78904

5 Faults Found:

18047 - Accelerator Position Sensor 1/2 (G79/G185): Implausible Signal
P1639 - 35-00 - -
18039 - Accelerator Position Sensor (G79): Signal too High
P1631 - 35-00 - -
18042 - Accelerator Position Sensor 2 (G185): Signal too High
P1634 - 35-00 - -
17950 - Angle Sensor 1 for Throttle Actuator (G187): Implausible Signal
P1542 - 35-10 - - - Intermittent
17581 - Angle Sensor 2 for Throttle Actuator (G188) Signal too High
P1173 - 35-10 - - - Intermittent

Answer!

Hay George.This is quite interesting that both your accelerator potentiometers and both your throttle body potentiometers are acting up at the same time. Normally I would say that your accelerator pedal needs to be replaced if only G79/G185 flags repeated DTCs. Alternatively say that your throttle body needs  cleaning and adaptation if G187/G188 flags repeated DTCs. But this is certainly not the case though both these circuits are notorious for "No Throttle Response", limp mode and turning on the EPC light.  However to me it looks more like the voltage supply line to both devices is acting up, that it's intermittent.  Since the throttle and the accelerator are each connected directly to the same control module (ECU) I'm tempted to say that the ECU plug is probably loose or corroded or the fuse holder that supplies the ECU with terminal 30 (12V unswitched) and the relay that supplies terminal  15 (12V switched) needs to be checked for proper contact and corrosion. What I am willing to say is that you have a wiring harness problem, so check continuity between the ECU and the accelerator pedal 6 pin plug and the ECU and the Throttle body 6 pin plug. Make certain to do adaptation afterwards and check throttle valve control in group  060“ (G187/G188),  and especially 62 (G187/G188 & G79/G185), and 63 (Kick-down) and if you have a cruise control group 66 as well.


Question?

I'm Renshaw and I have an Audi A4 1.8T. When I started my car from cold, the EPC light came on and the engine just stalled. Made a couple more attempts to start but engine just cranks and  wouldn't start. After a while I tried  again and it started just fine and it drove fine. The following day  I couldn't start the engine again. So like before I waited a while and it started fine and I drove all week without any EPC problems, until this morning while standing in peak hour traffic my car just died.  After a few tries the car finally started but while I was driving both the EPC and the MIL (check engine light) came on, the engine lost power and was idling at 1200 RPM. This happened a few time over the past month and I'm really loosing my patient with my Audi A4.  So when it happened again I limped to the service agents  who got the 2 DTC errors:  P0321 Ignition/Distributor Engine Speed Input Circuit Range/Performance and P0322 Ignition/Distributor Engine Speed Input Circuit No Signal, but they could get the car to switch off like it did with me. Something like the toothache goes away when you get to the dentist. Anyway, I've search the Internet forums for a  EPC problem similar to mine but found nothing. I still don't have any idea what's going on. Can you please help me and I would be very appreciative and thank you.


Answer!

Hi Renshaw, thanks for your question. The problem you describing is fairly common on Audi which normally flags any or all of the following DTCs - P0320, P0321, P0322 and  P0323  at the same time. This is undoubtedly or rather more often than not caused by your Engine Speed (RPM) sensor signal (crankshaft sensor) that is out of phase. Bear in mind that your car has a DIS and not a mechanical distributor which is normally driven by a gear on the camshaft. This implies that your camshaft / crankshaft have embedded  magnets that energizes  a hall sensor (crankshaft sensor) or an inductive sensor mounted on the cylinder block which  measures crankshaft speed (interval), that provides the engine speed signal to the ECU. It also doubles-up as the signal that determines the time and duration of the ignition (spark) as well as injector timing. Depending on the model, the crankshaft sensor is next to the oil filter. Crankshaft position sensor (G28) failure is also common on the new VW Polo the new Jetta. 

NB!
If you need help with your EPC problem or an explanation of your diagnostic scan and willing to share the findings with fellow Vag owners, feel free to link to this post and upload  your question and a scan of your car. Not every problem can be dealt since there are a fair amount of overlap / common problems, but I will try my very best to answer as many as possible.

Tuesday, July 28, 2015

EPC HELP

EPC HELP Q & A

VW Beetle EPC problems. Audi EPC light, Audi Q7, Audi TT, car trouble, DTC, drive by wire, DTC memory, EPC, EPC dashboard light, EPC faults, EPC problem, accelerator pedal adaptation, Audi EPC Light problem, Audi Q7, audi TT, car trouble, crankshaft position sensor, drive by wire, dtc, DTC memory, EPC, EPC dashboard light, EPC faults, EPC problem, high pressure fuel pump, Limp Mode, throttle body, VW Beetle, wiring harness, O2 sensor,


Question?

My name is Lilian. I bought a 2001 Volkswagen Beetle a few months back. Now it loses power whenever that EPC light and check engine light switches on. Lately it happens more  often, so I switch it off and after a while start it again and it drives ok for only a few miles. I just cant go on like this, its upsetting to the point that I can cry. The VW Beetle club members say its the throttle body, so my friend replaced it for me.  It was really expensive from the agents so a got a used one from the junk yard. It fixed the problem, or rather so I thought because after about 200 miles the problem is starting again. Now I feel helpless. Pleeeez help me. Pleez Pleeez Pleez!

Answer!

Hi Lil sorry to hear about your troubles. As much as I would like to help you, you gave me way too little information to steer you in the right direction. A diagnostic scan of the VW would have really been helpful but since you don't have one, fixing it is going to mere guess work. EPC faults, can be solved by a process of elimination and since you replaced the throttle body and it lasted for 200 miles, without a problem, it is very likely that it was the throttle body that was faulty but the question is, did your friend do the adaptation so that the ECU can properly interface and control it? Sounds like this is your problem. You need to take it to a diagnostics equipt workshop to have the throttle body adaptation reset. I'm almost certain that would solve your problem.
______________________________________

Question?

Me Zoe, I got Vw beetle, make power loss and make  EPC dashboard light on. I read  VW forum say was cause by brake light switch. I take my mechanic, he  say no fix, take  VW agents they recall VW Beetles with brake light switch problem. Me very lucky, VW agent replace it free but EPC problem no fix and now more worse. Happen every day. You me help. I you kiss.

 Answer!

Hello Zoe thank you, I am flattered that you want to kiss me. I have to tell you though, that the brake light switch has little to do with the EPC problem you are experiencing. The brake light normally has an influence on speedo-cruise and has nothing to do with EPC faults which are rather confined to the non-emission related components involved with fuel delivery and torque delivery. The variables are just too many to even guess what it could be. It could be one of many things that could be causing your problem. Even something as minor as a bit of dirt restraining your throttle control butterfly could cause a EPC problem.  Right now you problem could be anything from the crankshaft position sensor to the accelerator pedal position sensor. From your throttle body to the electrical connections, from your high pressure fuel pump to the ECU. I would suggest you have a  scan done then send it to me, perhaps we can try once again to define your EPC problem. I hope you understand my explanation. Cheers Zoe.
______________________________________

Question?

Hola mi amigo, tengo un problema en el polo de mi mujer, y es que se queda al arrancarlo por la mañana del garaje o cuando esta una tarde entera como hoy en la calle que ya hace freskito, como si no subiese de revoluciones,como muy flojo, si le aceleras lo calas, o aveces hace pequeñas detonaciones por el escape, esto le dura unos 20 segundos y ya se espavila. Es un polo 1.4i 80cv, tiene 20milkm, y no ha tenido otro fallo. Posibilidades? 1º Yo creo que puede ser sensor de temperatura de inyeccion, aunque me funcione bien la abuja que mide la temperatura del agua?. 2º bobina? No se que mas podria ser, en dias normales, o si lo arrancas despues de 3 horas o 10 minutos ya va perfecto. Le meti el VAGCOM y no me dio ningun tipo de error. Espero vuestras respuestas


Answer!


Hola a ti. Primero quiero  decir, hablo espanol un poquito pero voy a probar ayudar. Sin error del VAGCOM es mas dificil decir. Apuesto a que es problema de encendido pero dudo es la bobina si le dura de problema porque es solo 20 segundos.  Posiblemente son los bujias o la RON de gasolina no es correcto o tienes agua en la gasolina. Pequeñas detonaciones por el escape no es normal especialmente baja 20milkm. ¿qué pasa con su recien garantía?



______________________________________

Question?

Hello there, I hope you can shed some light on my problem, I'm having a mini crises with my Seat 1.8L Toledo. The EPC light came on yesterday, but when I turned the engine off and restarted, the EPC light went off and everything was fine until this morning. On my way to work  the car had a jerky/shudder and at that very moment the TC and EPC light came on and I lost power so that it would only rev to  2500 rpm. As a result I limped home them  I plugged in my VAGCOM. Very surprisingly there were no faults. So I decided to take the Toledo back on the road but when I turned on the ignition, the EPC/EM/TC lights came on. So once again I plugged  in my VAGCOM and the DTCs listed below was present. So I cleaned the Throttle Body and  checked the Throttle Body on group 060 and the adaptation field was showing 'ERROR'. What do I do now because I'm totally stuffed and need  a quick fix. Any light you can shed on this problem would be much appreciated.

VAGCOM: Chassis Type: 1M - Seat Leon/Toledo
Scan: 01 02 03 08 15 17 19 22 35 36 37 46 56

VIN: VSSZZZ1MZ3R1XXXXX Mileage: 164400km-102153miles
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Address 01: Engine Labels: 06A-906-032-AJQ.lbl
Part No: 06A 906 032 MJ
Component: 1.8L R4/5VT 01 0003 
Coding: 11510
Shop #: WSC 80179 
VSSZZZ1MZ3R1XXXXX SEZ7Z0C2XXXXX

4 Faults Found:
17967 - Throttle Body (J338): Fault in basic settings 
P1559 - 35-10 - - - Intermittent
17987 - Throttle Actuator (J338): Adaptation Not Started 
P1579 - 35-00 - - 
17579 - Angle Sensor 2 for Throttle Actuator (G188) Implausible Signal 
P1171 - 35-10 - - - Intermittent
17951 - Angle Sensor 1 for Throttle Actuator (G187): Signal too Small 
P1543 - 35-00 - - 

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Answer!

Hi Wayne, I'm glad to see that you uploaded your scan. Since the rest of your electronic modules have "No fault code found" beneath them, it essentially means that they are all OK. And seeing that you own a VAGCOM, I take it for granted that you may have had prior DTC which you erased. Erasing DTCs are OK but bear in mind that you also erase all values learnt by the ECU associated with your driving style including adaptation values.  The throttle body therefore needs to be re-adapted every time codes are cleared or control module  or battery power is disconnected. As the automatic adaptation software procedure runs, the control module learns the full range of throttle positions. So from what I can see above, the Idle Speed Control Throttle Position cannot be determined which could mean adaption needs to be done, or that the potentiometers in the throttle body may be near end of life. Overtime the slider wears through the carbon track so it makes intermittent contact and stymies the ECU. But before we condemn the throttle body, I need you to disconnect your battery at the earth terminal so that you can hard reset all the electronic modules. Make certain that the ignition is off  then reconnect the battery. Redo a scan and if all goes well, you will once again see your original 4 faults and 1  additional fault that looks something like "Supply Voltage Terminal 30: Signal Outside Specifications - attery/Generator supply faulty". This is absolutely normal because the ECU detected that the battery was disconnected. Plug in VAGCOM switch on the ignition but do not start the engine. Select VAGCOM 04-Basic Settings - which displays the Measuring Value Block screen. Select Measuring Value Block 060 (or 98) which displays the Basic Setting Value Block screen.  Channel 4 will display the word“Running” and other channels will display  the state of the throttle valve angle sensors but will change as the throttle is actuated by the ECM.  Please do not touch the throttle pedal nor turn  ignition key off during the adaptation because the throttle body adaptation relearn process is essential and may prevent the engine from starting if interrupted. If the adaptation was successful, Channel 4 will have changed from “Running” to “OK”. Display 3 would read "idle" and 1 & 2 display voltages levels, normally less than 5 Volts.  Logout, turn the ignition key off and wait about 1 minute seconds, to ensure that adaptation settings are saved then start the car. If however, it still shows "error" inspect the throttle body actuator connector contacts for damage or corrosion and make certain its contacts are secure then try to set adaptation again. If it still shows "error" clean the throttle body and check for wiring harness between the throttle body and the control module. Retry adaptation once again. As a last resort replace the throttle body because the potentiometers cannot be replaced as a separate item nor is it available for sale as a separate item. I hope this helps.

Saturday, July 25, 2015

INTERNAL CONTROL MODULE MEMORY ERROR

INTERNAL CONTROL MODULE MEMORY ERROR

DTC error 65535 (Internal Control Module Memory Error) suggests a problem was caused  within the said module. However, Electronic Control Modules are generally fairly robust and are designed with a MTBF of 1 million hours. My experience with electronic repairs over the past 30 years does not confirm this since I have had tons of electronic components failing during this time that was'nt expected to fail for at least another 10 years. Be that as it may, an Internal Control Module Memory Error may not even be caused by the module, so it should be the last component to suspect and replace because they are normally not cheap. Firstly check the battery Supply Voltage  and verify that it is constantly about 12V or higher. Also make sure that the alternator is charging, since a faulty alternator can lead to a slowly discharging battery not able to supply the minimum voltage required by the module that is flagging the  65535. Next check to wiring harness to and from the "faulty" Control Module. Make certain that the module has a ground connection (earth). If  VCDS displays an unexpected result or displays that the controller refused the command, it is most likely due to the wiring. Under intermittent wiring conditions it is generally difficult ifnot possible  to clear a  65535 (00-10) or (35-00) or (35-10) or (37-10). Wiring harness and its connectors are prone to corrosion due to condensation especially in cold weather. If needs be, unplug the connector and clean them and if possible check the physical contact with an ohm meter (but disconnect the battery first). Any Internal Control Module Memory Error associated with the Power steering  and ABS are critical and should be attended to immediately. Internal Control Module Memory Error associated with Airbags should be treated with caution since interrogation of the airbag with a scan tool could inadvertently trigger the airbag or turn on the airbag light which can only be switched off by replacing the airbag module. As can be seen below, virtually every electronic module can be a victim of 65535 - Internal Control Module Memory Error and as far as I am concerned, it most unlikely electronic design and quality control  will permit such modules to be installed in production units. The lateral acceleration sensor tend to cause an 65535 airbag error, the vacuum hose inside the ECU taking pressure to the barometric sensor tends to cause a 65535 error in Jetta's, barometric sensor itself tends to cause 65535 in Skodas.  As a last resort try replacing the module concerned.


Address 01: Engine
Chassis Type: 17 - VW Golf Citi
Part No: 6KS 906 258 k
Component: 1.4 MP9.0 26ZA0003
Shop #: 2227355880
65535 - Internal Control Module Memory Error

Address 02: Auto Trans
Chassis Type: 9M - VW Jetta IV
Control Module Part Number: 01M 927 733 KT
Component: AG4 Getriebe 01M 4891
Software Coding: 00000
Work Shop Code: WSC 00000
65535 - Internal Control Module Memory Error

Address 03: ABS Brakes
Chassis Type: 6Y - Skoda Fabia I
Part No: 6Q0 907 379 D
Component: ABS/ASR 5.7 FRONT V00
Coding: 00124
Shop #: WSC 13765
65535 - Internal Control Module Memory Error 

Address 03: ABS Brakes
Chassis Type: 1J - VW G/J/B Mk4
Part No: 1J0 907 379 AB
Component: ESP 20 CAN V005
Coding: 00214
Shop #: WSC 31414
65535 - Internal Control Module Memory Error

Address 03: ABS Brakes
Part No: 1C0 907 379
Component: ESP 20 CAN V005
Coding: 18945
Shop #: WSC 01317
65535 - Internal Control Module Memory Error

Address 03: ABS Brakes
Chassis Type: 6Y - Skoda Fabia
Controller: 6Q0 907 379 G
Component: ABS 5.7 FRONT V20
Coding: 00044
Shop #: WSC 13765
65535 - Internal Control Module Memory Error

Address 08:
Chassis Type: 6Y - Skoda Fabia
Controller: 6Y0 820 045
Component: Klimaanlage X0740
65535 - Internal Control Module Memory Error

Address 08:    
Chassis Type: 6Y - Skoda Fabia
Controller: 5J0 820 045
Component: Klimaanlage  X0850
65535 - Internal Control Module Memory Error

Address 08: Auto HVAC
Chassis Type: 6L - Seat Ibiza/Cordoba
Part No: 6L0 820 045 C
Component: Klimaanlage X00.8
65535 - Internal Control Module Memory Error

Address 08: Auto HVAC
Part No: 5J0 820 045
Chassis Type: Skoda Fabia 2
Component: Klimaanlage X0850
65535 - Internal Control Module Memory Error

Address 15: Airbags
Chassis Type: 9N - VW Polo
Part No: 1C0 909 605 K
Component: 18 AIRBAG VW51 0P 0010
Coding: 12600
Shop #: WSC 00788
65535 - Internal Control Module Memory Error

Address 15: Airbags
Chassis Type: 9N - VW Polo
Part No: 6Q0 909 601 F
Component: 05 AIRBAG VW5 0010
Coding: 12341
Shop #: WSC 31414
65535 - Internal Control Module Memory Error

Address 15: Airbags
Chassis Type: 6L - Seat Ibiza/Cordoba
Part No: 6Q0 909 601 F
Component: 01 AIRBAG VW5 0010
Coding: 12337
Shop #: WSC 06441
65535 - Internal Control Module Memory Error

Address 17: Instruments
Chassis Type: 8E - Audi A4 B6/B7
Part No: 8E0 920 900 HX
Component: KOMBI+WEGFAHRS. RB4 D27
Coding: 00142
Shop #: WSC 19411
65535 - Internal Control Module Memory Error

Address 37: Navigation
Part No: 3B0 919 887 D
Component: Navigation  BNO 0201
65535 - Internal Control Module Memory Error

Address 45: Inter. Monitor
Chassis Type: 6N -  VW Polo
Part No: 6N0 951 171
Component: Innenraumueberw. 0002
65535 - Internal Control Module Memory Error

Address 56: Radio
Part No: 1C0 035 157 C
Component: Radio DE2 0004
Coding: 00401
Shop #: WSC 00066
65535 - Internal Control Module Memory Error

Address 56: Radio
Part No: 1J0 035 180 B
Component: Radio DE2 0004
Coding: 01031
65535 - Internal Control Module Memory Error